Three-for-One: Traffic (2000), Dancer in The Dark (2000), Petite Maman (2021)

Three reviews for one: Soderbergh’s Traffic, Sciamma’s Petite Maman, ans Von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark … More Three-for-One: Traffic (2000), Dancer in The Dark (2000), Petite Maman (2021)

Blonde (2022) is offensively one-note on Monroe, but the bigger offence is being incredibly boring

Aside from being hit repeatedly with her inner turmoil, the playful approach to the actual history of Monroe makes this even more of a bother. Instead of getting genuine scenes with Billy Wilder or when making The Asphalt Jungle, it’s again, glossed over to move the focus back to the pain. This approach is mind-numbingly boring to watch and there’s virtually no reason for me to ever return to this film in the future.  … More Blonde (2022) is offensively one-note on Monroe, but the bigger offence is being incredibly boring

Hideo Gosha’s “Three Outlaw Samurai” (1964) a brilliant use of the wandering Samurai trope

Three Outlaw Samurai (1964) is akin to a Hideo Gosha morality picture, simple in terms of concept, plot, and characters but relating a story of trauma hidden away from nobility. It’s ostensibly a story of the Shogun coming face-to-face with the hurt their greed has caused and having to reconcile with this fact. The wandering Samurai caught in the midst of a village conflict and his humanity rising to the surface narrative.  … More Hideo Gosha’s “Three Outlaw Samurai” (1964) a brilliant use of the wandering Samurai trope

Crime School (1939) the Warner Bros obvious Dead End (1937) knock-off

The Dead End Kids being sold with Humphrey Bogart, Crime School (1939) is the Warner Bros version of Dead End (1937). A cheap attempt to profit off the discovery of this group of Brooklyn teenagers with charm, comedic timing and acting instincts
More Crime School (1939) the Warner Bros obvious Dead End (1937) knock-off

Capsule review: Chūshingura: Hana no Maki, Yuki no Maki (1962) – the best of the 47 Ronin

Many films have been made about the 47 Ronin story. No other piece of Japanese history has been portrayed this many times in 24 frames and Hiroshi Ingaki’s take is one of my favorites.
More Capsule review: Chūshingura: Hana no Maki, Yuki no Maki (1962) – the best of the 47 Ronin

No Man’s Land (2001) the messy, unthinking psychology of war

Two soldiers caught in no man’s land – one Bosnian, one Serb, barely keeping the thin veil of civility held together, while the threat of grave violence sits overhead. The pressure comes and goes, as the two soldiers seek a general truce with the understanding that violence could erupt at any time. Danis Tanović understands the psychology of the soldiers, the media covering the absurd event, and the UN soldiers having to take the impossible position of peacekeeper. It paints the situation as the evil and the obscurity of war impacting all interested parties. … More No Man’s Land (2001) the messy, unthinking psychology of war